Crusader Crosses

Flesh is as malleable as clay for many demons and their servants of evil. To aid in distinguishing allies from even the best disguised foes, crusaders during the First Mendevian Crusade began etching family names, ranks, and homelands on the back of their even-armed crosses. As the Mendevian Crusades wore on, more and more soldiers from many different walks and faiths adopted the practice, to the point that, nearly a century later, many of those who fight against the demonic hosts bear these crosses as concrete proof of their identity.

The badges are typically made of a distinctive wood or metal, which are constant between members of the same fighting group. An individual has their name, rank, and nation etched on the side opposite a family crest or personal emblem. True crusaders crosses are never made of gold, and anyone with a gold cross is dubbed an ostentatious egoist, lying rube, or spy.

A crusader’s cross is usually kept hidden beneath ones armor or in a backpack so creatures that may attempt to imitate the soldier cannot see it. Crusaders sometimes call upon one another to recite their crosses, often before taking up a new post or camping for the night. Those wishing to enter the city of Kenabres often prove their identity to the guardsman by reciting their crosses as well. Those who cannot are separated from their fellow travelers are required to submit to the Four Gates.

Crusader Crosses

Wrath of the Righteous Gopalkrishna